Tag: Travel with Pets

Daily Photo – July 20, 2020

A few minutes of play along Green Turtle Cay’s ocean beach

Got post-Dorian Abaco shots to share with our readers? Email them to amanda (at) littlehousebytheferry (dot) com, and put READER PHOTOS in the subject line.

Be sure to let me know who should get photo credit and where/roughly when the image was taken. And if you’ve got a business or personal website or page you’d like me to link to, please include it.

Reader Q&A: Pet Import Permit

I often receive queries from blog followers about various topics related to visiting Abaco. To assist other readers who might have the same questions, I’m launching a regular Reader Q&A feature. Today’s Q&A has to do with importing pets to the Bahamas.

Question: Do you have to get a new pet import permit for Wrigley every time you bring him into the Bahamas?

Canine Distemper Outbreak in Nassau

The Veterinary Medical Association of the Bahamas has issued an advisory about a severe outbreak of canine distemper in Nassau, Bahamas.

bahamas, potcake, dog

Healthy Bahamian potcake at a Marsh Harbour spay/neuter clinic.

If you plan to bring your dog to the Bahamas in the near future, you may want to bypass Nassau altogether.

If you must bring your pet to Nassau, or if you’re currently there, be sure your dog is properly vaccinated, and adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Do not transport dogs of any age from Nassau to other Bahamian islands, as it appears that the latter remain distemper-free.
  • Keep dogs on your property or vessel. Limit walks and avoid contact with other dogs for at least the next three weeks.
  • Use a mix of 30 parts water to 1 part bleach to disinfect surfaces, shoes, feet, etc.

The good news is that, in warm climates and sunlight, the distemper virus is killed off within a few hours. During that time, however, it’s highly contagious.

More than half of all distemper cases are fatal and there is no known cure.  According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), distemper is passed from dog to dog through direct contact with fresh urine, blood or saliva. Dogs can also contract distemper by sharing food and water bowls, or by being nearby coughing and sneezing dogs. Early signs of distemper include sneezing, coughing, running eyes or nose, fever, lethargy, sudden vomiting and diarrhea, depression and/or loss of appetite.

The Veterinary Medical Association of the Bahamas says the disease is NOT a risk to humans or cats.

For more information, or if you suspect your dog may be infected, contact a local vet or the Bahamas Humane Society. Authorities ask that, to avoid infecting other animals, you do not bring the animal into veterinary waiting rooms without advance arrangements.

Related:

ASPCA Pet Care – About Distemper

About Canine Distemper – Pet MD

And Your Little Dog, Too (With Video)

Much as Tom and I enjoy the time we spend on Green Turtle Cay, we suspect our dog, Wrigley, loves it even more.

Though he’s not exactly what you’d call a champion swimmer, Wrigley loves to splash around at the water’s edge, and he’ll gladly swim out to Tom or me for a bit of hot dog before paddling back to the sand. As you can see in the above video, though, his favourite Abaco activity is tearing up and down the beach, grinning ear-to-ear, spraying sand, digging holes and chasing sandpipers and seagulls.

Fortunately for Wrigley, at 14 lbs, he’s small enough to fly with us in-cabin. Fortunately for us, he’s a terrific traveler — far more pleasant and patient during the trip than either Tom or me. In fact, ticket agents, flight attendants and fellow passengers often ask if we’re sure there’s really a dog in his carrier.

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