Tag: Little House by the Ferry

It’s Finally Time: A Fish Hooks Update

Over the past six weeks, Tom and I have received so many kind calls, emails, texts, Facebook and Whatsapp messages and more, inquiring about our little house by the ferry and how it fared during Hurricane Dorian. Until now, however, I just didn’t feel ready to talk about it.  

Fish Hooks Cottage – April 2019

Early on Sunday, September 1, as Dorian barreled northwest along the coast of Abaco toward Green Turtle Cay, we began hearing how severely Hope Town and Marsh Harbour had been hit. At that point, Tom and I made peace with the fact that Fish Hooks would likely be destroyed.

“Those Who Stayed” is now in the Green Turtle Cay Public Library

Presenting a copy of Those Who Stayed to GTC Library volunteer librarian, Aylin Zayfer.

Last trip to the cay, I dropped into the Green Turtle Cay Public Library to donate a copy of my book, Those Who Stayed.

The library has a terrific Bahamian reference and research section (I often find books about Bahamian culture and history there that I can’t find anywhere else) so I’m super excited that my book is now a part of it!  

If it’s been a while, or if you’ve never visited the library, do check it out. Operated by a dedicated group of volunteer librarians led by Seanna Dames, the library is located in the town’s administrative complex in the heart of New Plymouth.

There’s a terrific selection of books for adults and kids, DVDs and jigsaw puzzles, all available on loan.

Key West Art & Historical Society Commemorates the Bahamian/Key West Connection

During the early 1800s, wrecking was a common occupation for Bahamian residents, and many plied their trade in the waters surrounding the Florida Keys. In 1825, however, the U.S. Congress passed the Federal Wrecking Act, which stipulated that goods salvaged from any vessel wrecked in American waters must be brought to a U.S. port.

In the decades that followed, hundreds of Bahamians, including wreckers, boat builders and those in related professions from Eleuthera, Harbour Island and Abaco relocated to Key West. To this largely uninhabited island, they brought everything, up to and including their houses!    

NaBloPoMo 2018: I Guess We’re Doing This

Several times over the past few years, I’ve participated in National Blog Post Month (NaBloPoMo,) where bloggers commit to posting at least one post a day for a month.

I’ve always enjoyed the challenge, so I was disappointed that there didn’t seem to be a formal NaBloPoMo scheduled for 2018.

On the other hand, I’m already behind on a couple of projects, and it did occur to me that I’d have to be crazy to take on writing 30 new blog posts in a month. Still, one of the projects on which I’m behind is blog posting, so…

I decided start my own unofficial NaBloPoMo, but not formally announce it, since I had my doubts I’d be able to put together a new blog post every day this month.

However, according to Tom, this is wimpy. According to him, I need to commit.

So, here I go. Formally (and belatedly…) committing to completing NaBloPoMo 2018. Wish me luck!

Better Late Than Never

Though I was busy caring for Wrigley post-surgery and didn’t get to commemorate it, April 27, 2018 marked a major anniversary – it made five years since my very first post here at Little House by the Ferry!

And though I’m terribly late, I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to thank everyone who reads and follows this blog.

In the beginning, Little House by the Ferry was really just intended as a way to update our close family and friends about the progress of our Fish Hooks restoration.

But as Tom and I learned more about the history of the house and of Green Turtle Cay, I wanted to share what we had uncovered.

Blogging here resulted in my writing Those Who Stayed. And, earlier this year, some of my favourites of the gazillions of photos I’ve taken for the blog found their way into the Little House by the Ferry product line of home decor, stationery and gift items (which make excellent Christmas gifts for the Abaco lover on your gift list… hint, hint.)

To date, more than 258,795 people have visited Little House by the Ferry, and I’ve had more than 677,211 page views. Over the past five years, I’ve posted 1,941 times.

So, in case I haven’t said it lately, THANK YOU! For reading, following and commenting on this blog. For sharing it with others.

For contacting me with your questions and comments. For sending in your reader photos (please keep sending them!) and for helping me identify the faces in mine.

If you’re on social media, I hope you’ll drop by and say hello there as well. Here’s where you can find me:

Twitter: @AmandaLDiedrick
Instagram: @littlehousebytheferry
Pinterest: Little House by the Ferry

Thank you again, and here’s to our next five years together!

The LHBTF 2019 Green Turtle Cay Calendars Have Arrived!

The first copies of the LHBTF 2019 just arrived this afternoon and, if I do say so myself, they look great!

Featuring a different, full-colour Green Turtle Cay photograph for each month, this spiral-bound wall calendar makes a great souvenir or gift — for yourself or someone else.

Printed on premium-quality, glossy card stock, it measures 8.5” x 11” (11” x 17” when open) and includes public holidays for the Bahamas, the U.S. and Canada.

To order your 2019 GTC calendar, click HERE.

The 2019 Green Turtle Cay, Bahamas Wall Calendar is Now Available. Makes a great gift or souvenir!

Look What We Found!

A few days after Tom produced this video, we were rooting around in Fish Hooks cellar, and guess what he uncovered…?

Cellar Marble

Yep, a marble! We don’t know for sure whether it dates back to the childhood meeting of my grandparents that Tom describes in the cellar video, but based on a little preliminary research into vintage marbles, it very well could.

Also, turns out that Tom and I may both have been wrong as to the origin of all those glass bottles beneath the house. Since I posted the cellar video, a number of local folks have told me that, in years gone by, Green Turtle Cay residents collected glass bottles for toting water from the communal spigot, storing kerosene for stoves and canning tomatoes.

The latter seemed a bit strange to me. After all, these narrow-necked bottles don’t seem particularly well-suited for canning. But sure enough, in reviewing notes I made of my grandmother’s childhood recollections, Pa Herman grew what she referred to as “bottling tomatoes,” and my uncle confirms that, indeed, Pa Herman and Ma May preserved tomatoes in glass bottles similar to those in the cellar.

LHBTF Featured in Coastal Angler Magazine Online

Coastal Angler Oct 2013 Bahamas Bliss

What a lovely surprise for the three-month anniversary of Little House by the Ferry! The blog is featured in this month’s Coastal Angler Magazine’s Bahamas Bliss online column.

Since its July launch, Little House by the Ferry has had more than 16,000 page views by 6,000+ unique visitors in 48 countries around the world. A warm thank you to everyone who’s visited, commented on or followed LHBTF over the past three months. I’m having a great deal of fun writing about Green Turtle Cay’s past and present and getting to know other GTC lovers. It’s also been wonderful to connect with distant relatives I didn’t know before now.

I look forward to sharing more about Fish Hooks and Green Turtle Cay in the months ahead. In the meantime, if you’ve got historic GTC stories or photos you’d like to share, please get in touch.

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