Tag: Fish Hooks Cottage

It’s Finally Time: A Fish Hooks Update

Over the past six weeks, Tom and I have received so many kind calls, emails, texts, Facebook and Whatsapp messages and more, inquiring about our little house by the ferry and how it fared during Hurricane Dorian. Until now, however, I just didn’t feel ready to talk about it.  

Fish Hooks Cottage – April 2019

Early on Sunday, September 1, as Dorian barreled northwest along the coast of Abaco toward Green Turtle Cay, we began hearing how severely Hope Town and Marsh Harbour had been hit. At that point, Tom and I made peace with the fact that Fish Hooks would likely be destroyed.

Fish Hooks Restoration Update: Another Small Step

It feels like ages since we’ve made real progress at Fish Hooks. In 2017, we installed windows and air conditioning, which went a long way towards making the house livable.

April 2018 – Wrigley recovers from the first of two surgeries he had last year.

And we had big plans for 2018, but those were interrupted by Wrigley’s injuries and the weather — it rained for much of the five weeks Tom had set aside to come down and work on the house.

(With the house being so small, he has to set up his workbench and tools in the back yard, so Mother Nature’s cooperation is required!)

We have a lot planned for this year’s trip, and I’ll tell you more in a future post.

In the meantime, I do have a bit of progress to report. We have front steps!

Daily Photo – April 27, 2019

True story – one day last summer, I was talking to our gardener about our plans for the front yard at Fish Hooks. I pointed to the plant above. “You may as well take that one out,” I said. “It’s not terribly pretty. And it’s never, ever flowered.” Three days later? I came out one morning to find this! Needless to say, it stayed.

A Swimming Pool for Under $500?

Yes, I know. We’ve got some of the world’s best beaches just a few minutes away. Still, I’d love to have a swimming pool at Fish Hooks. Sometimes you just want a quick, cool dip without the salty skin and sand-caked dog.

For a bunch of reasons, though, a full-sized swimming pool isn’t practical for us. An above-ground pool would require constructing a permanent concrete pad, while an in-ground pool would require major (and expensive!) excavation of our solid-rock back yard. And don’t even get me started on the hassle and cost of maintaining either one, especially when we’re off the island.   

But recently, I’ve discovered a much better option — stock tank pools. Am I the only one who’s never heard of them? All of a sudden, they’re everywhere on Pinterest and Instagram.  

Moving House on Green Turtle Cay

When we moved Fish Hooks cottage in 2014, it was kind of a big deal. We had to stop traffic on the one route out of town, and the local folks came by to watch. Our local newspaper, the Abaconian even covered the move.

Moving Day at Fish Hooks, January 2014

In past years, however, moving house was fairly common in the islands. Several older homes on Green Turtle Cay were moved short distances on rollers. A few, we’re told, were even floated to new destinations on the cay before being set in place.

But that’s nothing compared to the sorts of moves some former Green Turtle Cay residents made back in the mid-1800s.

Look What We Found!

A few days after Tom produced this video, we were rooting around in Fish Hooks cellar, and guess what he uncovered…?

Cellar Marble

Yep, a marble! We don’t know for sure whether it dates back to the childhood meeting of my grandparents that Tom describes in the cellar video, but based on a little preliminary research into vintage marbles, it very well could.

Also, turns out that Tom and I may both have been wrong as to the origin of all those glass bottles beneath the house. Since I posted the cellar video, a number of local folks have told me that, in years gone by, Green Turtle Cay residents collected glass bottles for toting water from the communal spigot, storing kerosene for stoves and canning tomatoes.

The latter seemed a bit strange to me. After all, these narrow-necked bottles don’t seem particularly well-suited for canning. But sure enough, in reviewing notes I made of my grandmother’s childhood recollections, Pa Herman grew what she referred to as “bottling tomatoes,” and my uncle confirms that, indeed, Pa Herman and Ma May preserved tomatoes in glass bottles similar to those in the cellar.

Fish Hooks Video Diary: Beam It Up

As you can see in this latest entry in our Fish Hooks video diary, Oral, Jason and Gavin have made great progress in the past few days. “Moving day” is growing ever near. We expect it will be sometime next week, depending on the availability of the crane. Will keep you posted!

A huge thank you to my husband, Tom Walters, for all the hours he’s put into documenting the restoration of our little house by the ferry. No doubt these are videos we will treasure in the years to come.

Related Stories: We’ve Hooked the Small One, Fish Hooks Update – The Inspection, Attic Archaeology, And Then There Were These…, Fish Hooks Update, Fish Hooks Video Diary: A Solid Start, Fish Hooks Video Diary: The Cellar, Fish Hooks Video Diary: Ready, Set…, Fish Hooks Video Diary: The Move.

Fish Hooks Video Diary: The Cellar

There’s a lot of work being done underneath our little house by the ferry in preparation for the big move. Over the weekend, Tom explored the old cellar beneath Fish Hooks, and documented his discoveries for our restoration video diary.

Oral, Jason and Gavin are making terrific progress, and the house should be ready to move later this week or early next. We’ll post a move date as soon as it’s confirmed.

Related Posts: Fish Hooks Update – The Inspection, Attic Archaeology, And Then There Were These…, Fish Hooks Update, Fish Hooks Video Diary: A Solid StartFish Hooks Video Diary: Beam It Up, Fish Hooks Video Diary: Ready, Set…, Fish Hooks Video Diary: The Move.

Fish Hooks Video Diary: A Solid Start

As you can see in the above video, our restoration of Fish Hooks is finally underway. First thing Monday, Tom and I met with Jason and Oral Bethel to finalize plans for the project.

Almost everything will proceed as originally planned, except for moving the house. Instead of jacking it up and rolling it back onto its new foundation, we’ve decided to use a huge crane to lift and move it. Not only will this result in less stress to the structure, but, as a bonus, it should shorten the move time considerably.

Work officially began Tuesday morning. By the time I arrived at the property that day, the location for the new foundation had been marked off. By mid-afternoon, most of the 12 holes into which the 16”x16” footings will fit had already been chiseled out of the rock.

Happy New Year from Green Turtle Cay!

Photo by Tom Walters

Photo by Tom Walters

I’ve been blogging less than I’d like over the past month or so, partly because of holiday commitments and partly because I’ve been helping a friend with a project which I hope to be able to share with you soon.

However, we arrived in Green Turtle Cay this past Friday, and I’m excited to get back to Little House by the Ferry and on to the restoration of Fish Hooks.

Thank you!

Unidentified Purple FlowersIt was a month ago today that I took a deep breath and clicked the button that made Little House By The Ferry visible to the public. Since then, the blog has had more than 2,000 site visitors and 5,100+ page views, and I’ve received some very kind comments and lovely notes. As you can probably tell, Green Turtle Cay and Fish Hooks hold special places in my heart, and I love being able to share them with others.

A warm thank you to everyone who’s taken the time to visit, comment on or follow the blog. Your readership and feedback are much appreciated. I look forward to sharing more of our Green Turtle Cay adventures with you in the days ahead.

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